Yvonne Carts-Powell

Liveblogging "The Eclipse, Part 1"

In Heroes Episodes on November 24, 2008 at 10:47 pm

So the eclipse is the deadline, and Claire is the catalyst.

Note to Dad: bonus points for teaching your daughter self defense. You waited until she was how old before starting? After she’s started dating, after people have attempted to rape her, shot her (multiple times), and stalked her through her high school? This is lousy forward planning. Also, during at crisis is not the time to motivate with mind-games.

Mohinder’s ability is to make his clothes turn to goo!

Mohinder is going Kafka-esque. His scales have gone away? I missed that part. Maybe he was becoming gecko-like? But geckos don’t use goo to stick to walls, and Mohinder is looking pretty gooey right now. Hey! Mohinder’s ability is to make his clothes turn to goo!

Welcome to Haiti, Nathan and Peter. Presumably in Haiti, the character has more of a name than, “The Haitian.”

Samedi is The Haitian’s brother. His skin is impenetrable, huh?

Okay, 10-year-old Hiro is silly, but he has a point when he’s talking to Matt: it’s not the size of your power that’s important: it’s what you do with it.

Okay, Mrs. Bennet, this is the second time I’d suggest you kick Mr. Bennet to the curb.

Okay, let’s talk eclipses. A full solar eclipse is when the moon is directly between the sun and the earth. The moon doesn’t shadow the entire daylight side of the Earth, so some places see a complete eclipse, some a partial eclipse, and some no eclipse at all.

An eclipse has two effects. First, obviously, the light changes. But for people and critters who are used to artificial lights, there’s some question of how much difference that makes. Second, the two biggest gravity wells near our planet are lined up on the same side of the planet, which means that we see bigger tides as their gravity pulls water (and solid ground, to a lesser extent) towards it. Most of the ocean’s tides are dictated by the moon (it’s much much smaller than the sun, but it is a whole lot closer, and the force of gravity falls as the square of distance), so an eclipse doesn’t create catastrophic tides, but it is a noticeable effect. Neither of these have anything to do with superpowers, though.

Advertisements
  1. “Okay, let’s talk eclipses. A full solar eclipse is when the moon is directly between the sun and the earth. The moon doesn’t shadow the entire daylight side of the Earth, so some places see a complete eclipse, some a partial eclipse, and some no eclipse at all.”

    And don’t you go blind if you stare at one too long? Everybody kept looking up at it! That irked me so much-it’s like “Look! Up in the sky! It’s the sun! It’s the moon! It’s a solar eclipse! Let’s stare at it for long amounts of time and then wonder why we can’t see anymore!”

  2. Well sure — our eyes can be damaged when we look at anything too bright, or at any unshielded nuclear reactor closer than many light-years away.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: